What You Should Know About Court Approved Anger Management Classes


Thinking about signing up for court-approved anger management classes? If so, you’re not alone. In fact, thousands of people in the U.S. each year take these courses after getting arrested or cited for a crime stemming from an act of aggression. This is usually because they acted on their anger before they knew how to manage it appropriately and constructively. Fortunately, these classes can help you avoid further legal issues by meeting your court or probation officer’s requirements for them and demonstrating a change in your approach to handling stress and other difficult emotions going forward. However, there are many different anger management programs out there with various benefits and drawbacks. Before you enroll in any one of them, here is what you should know about court-approved anger management classes.


What is a Court-Approved Anger Management Class?

When you’re facing a criminal charge, part of your sentence may include enrolling in an anger management course. Such classes are available online and in-person and are intended for people who’ve been given a sentence that requires them to take them in order to fulfill the court’s requirements. When you enroll in court-approved classes, you’ll likely be required to complete them within a certain amount of time. The course will typically include multiple hours of in-person or online instruction. The majority of these programs are developed by therapists, social workers, and educators with expertise in anger management, interpersonal communication, and other related topics. Seeking a program created by experts is important.


Who Offers These Courses?

As with many other types of psychotherapy and counseling, there is no governing body in the U.S. that accredits or certifies anger management programs. This means that anyone can call their program “court-approved” or “state-certified,” even if they don’t actually meet those qualifications. As such, you should do a bit of research to find the best court-approved anger management program possible. Be sure to check out reviews and speak with a few different providers to make sure you’re choosing the right one. While there are no official standards, you should look for courses that are 4 to 8 hours long and are developed by professionals.


What Is Taught in a Court-Approved Class?

Court-approved anger management classes will vary depending on the program. However, topics that should be addressed include:


  • Helping to understand your unhealthy approach to anger

  • Helping you understand the causes and impacts of anger

  • Teaching about the consequences of anger

  • Providing behavioral techniques to manage emotions

  • Focus on how we all face challenges we have in our lives and the choices we might make when dealing with them.


Are Anger Management Classes Worth It?

Anger Management Classes are one of the most effective ways to improve your ability to manage difficult emotions like anger, anxiety, and stress. In many cases, they can also help protect you from being arrested again for future crimes related to violence and aggression. If you have a court-mandated requirement to take such a program, you should take it as seriously as possible. Choose an online or in-person program that’s taught by an expert in anger management and make sure you put in the time and effort necessary to make the most of it.


Advent eLearning is a great choice for online anger management courses. Click here to learn more or to sign up for a course.


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